Guest Post: Gone Girl Review

guest-post

It’s always nice to get an email asking to contribute to Confessions From A Geek Mind!

I like to introduce Alyssa Hale who has written an insightful look at this year’s most talked about film, Gone Girl.  Whilst I’ve yet to see it (I know, I know), Alyssa’s review has increased the urgency, not only because I’m a David Fincher fan, but the complexity of the film sounds like it’s right up my street.

If you have a review you want to share or a topic of interest, don’t be shy!  Come and join in the fun and contact me.

In the meantime, enjoy the review.

Alyssa, over to you 🙂


Gone Girl is, at the moment, the best movie I’ve seen in 2014.

I’ve never read the novel by Gillian Flynn before, but the movie itself is striking enough. There was never a moment of boredom in 149 minutes; and the deep if not disturbing feeling that left in my mind could only be matched by Christopher Nolan’s Inception.

It all started when Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) realized that his wife Amy (Rosamund Pike), a famous novelist, had disappeared on their 5th wedding anniversary. So he called the police, phoned Amy’s parents, and even asked for public help – the normal things that a person would do when a family member is missing. So everything seemed completely normal on surface.

GoneGirl_2

But was Nick actually worried about his wife? Probably not, because when he was asked to smile on the public help news conference, he could give a huge and genuine smile – how could a husband who really cared his lost wife grin like it was his birthday party? And soon the audience knew that the marriage of Amy and Nick was, in fact, on the edge of breaking. The couple once lived in New York, but in an economic crisis, both of them were laid off and Nick decided to move back to Missouri to take care of his ill mother – without the consent of Amy. Since then, the couple had lots of fights and quarrels over everything that happened in their lives. Moreover, Nick was a cheater. Not a cheater who “uncontrollably” or “occasionally” slept with a random girl when he was drunk, but a cheater who dared to have sex with his mistress – a twenty-year-old college student like those girls you could see on Bazoocam – on the couch of his sister’s house after his wife was gone.

Until this point, the audience’s sympathy for Nick should come to a halt. Then came the real reason why Amy was gone – everything was her plot to take revenge on her infidel husband. So she created a “crime scene” where it seemed she was murdered by Nick, and to flame the public’s hatred towards Nick, she even faked a pregnancy test. And soon enough, Nick became the number one enemy of the entire country who had murdered his lonely pregnant wife, while Amy was away… As the film develops, the audience would discover that Amy was a real criminal, and could do literally anything for no one but herself.

As I stepped out of the theater, I couldn’t help but think about the questions about relationships and marriage that have been haunting us for too long. What damages a marriage the most? Is it some kind of “force majeure” like poor economy or sickness, or is it infidelity? And is it ever right for a person who was being cheated on to do whatever he or she pleases for revenge’s sake? Furthermore, as depicted in the movie, Amy was an intelligent and successful New Yorker, and a typical “Type A”; in contrary, Nick is from the more laid-back Missouri, and as you can guess, a “Type B” person. So to take an even further step back, could two people who are the exact opposite of each other really enjoy their “happily after ever”? I really doubt it. Perhaps next time before I start a relationship, I should make sure that neither of us is a Type A.

Author: Kelechi Ehenulo

Creator and writer of Confessions From A Geek Mind. Loves sci-fi and LEGO - couldn't ask for a better combo!

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